Tag Archives: sculptures

Sydney’s Royal Botanic Gardens

‘Have you ever noticed that botanical gardens often make you think of Paradise?”  Francis Halle French botanist 2004

Welcome to the Royal Sydney Botanic Gardens, a little piece of paradise in Australia’s largest city.

….who would be anywhere else on a lovely summer’s day?

Sydney Harbour, Royal Botanic Gardens, Harbour Bridge

The Royal Botanic Gardens were established in 1816 and cover an area of 30 hectares along the foreshore of Sydney harbour.

Plants, lawns, trees and bush line the edge of the city right up to the Opera House and give views of the Harbour Bridge.

Can you imagine trying to preserving that amount of prime land for the public today?

Salute to our visionary forebears!

The Gardens are home to nearly 9000 plant species from all over the world, with a focus on Australia and the South Pacific.

A sign near the sculptures says…

‘ Before European settlement this foreshore was a mud flat. Seeds, flotsam were washed up by waves. Ships arrived in the tide in 1788 and crops were planted soon after. This area has been dedicated ever since to the introduction and propagation of plants reflecting the changing culture and horticultural needs of the day.”

Palm by Bronwyn Oliver

 

 

 

 

 

 

Magnolia by Bronwyn Oliver

These sculptures symbolise the seeds washed up by the tide, blown by the wind, eroded by the water, and laden with potential for vigour and transformation.

The huge older trees, like this fig tree have been given space and time to grow, and now they provide plentiful shade in summer. (They say the shade of a big tree is worth one air-conditioner)

The flowers of the mature Magnolia trees are magnificent at this time of the year.

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This tropical garden has lush colourful foliage, and flamboyant flowers and plants…orchids, hibiscus, palm….sensory overload while I sit nearby drinking iced coffee!

Cannas

 

Frangipani

Our home in Canberra, a four hour drive away, is a world away in terms of  plants and climatic conditions. We have hot dry summers and cold, frosty winters. The Sydney climate of long humid summers and mild winters is a big contrast.

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The Botanic Gardens provide habitat for wildlife….colourful birds, fruit bats and water dragons..

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Rainbow Lorikeet

The Herb gardens, not far from the city streets, have blossoming herbs, sunflowers and all kinds of bee attracting flowers…

…what a bonus to have so much variety in such a big bustling city…

 

 

 

This beautiful sundial was fascinating for tourists and especially children…..imagine the sun directing our time rather than our Iphones ….incredible!

I love visiting big cities like Sydney…but, thank goodness for gardens like this glorious one…..

I return to my favourite quote….(one day I will find out who wrote it..)

”when the world wearies, and society does not satisfy, there is always the garden”

Salute again to those generous forebears who had the wisdom and energy to started this wonderful garden… for everyone.

Copyright Geraldine Mackey All Rights Reserved

 

 

 

Gardens and sculptures at the National Gallery of Australia

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The gardens of the National Gallery of Australia are some of Canberra’s best kept secrets.

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The National Gallery is designed to have outdoor ‘rooms’, all with Australian native plants. The soft greys, blues and greens blend together to make tranquil settings such as this.

Water, our most precious resource, features throughout the gardens.

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These grounds are perfect settings for sculptures.  This is Gaston Lachaise’s Floating Figure…. could there be a better backdrop for this lovely sculpture?

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A fog sculpture, created by Fujiko Nakaya from Japan is rising up from a pond of water…this is a wonderfully cool and shady spot, very popular for summer weddings.

The Cones Sculptures designed by Bert Flugelman are shining through the trees.

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This sculpture, The Angel of the North, has, over time, become my favourite. It is a maquette produced from the original Angel of the North by Antony Gormley in Britain.

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Quite by chance we had seen one of Antony Gormley’s sculptures in the crypt of Winchester Cathedral in England, this one is called simply Sound 11…a mysterious life-sized statue of a man contemplating the water held in his cupped hands.

I like his sculptures and I was pleased to know that we had one in Canberra.

Antony Gormley had the north of England firmly in mind when he created The Angel of the North, and he is quoted as saying that people interpret the statue in their own way, and take ownership of it.

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I think the Australian Angel of the North is perfectly placed at the edge of Lake Burley Griffin, surrounded by the sights, smells and sounds of the Australian bush capital.

She seems to be watching over the city in a quiet, protective way.

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